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The 10 most common interior fails

The 10 most common interior fails

From using an excessively mall mat to placing all furniture along the wall; There are many interior flaws that take away from the overall impression of your home. Below we list ten of the most common interior fails and tips on how to avoid them!Photo by Alexandra Gorn Curtains blocking the natural lightThick curtains can be extremely beautiful, but if they prevent daylight from reaching the entire room, your room will feel much less inviting.Do this instead: Choose a clean curtain in a neutral color. It provides texture and warmth while being crisp and bright enough to allow more of the much sought-after daylight. To maximize natural light if your room has small windows – avoid placing furniture directly in front of the windows, especially if the furnitures are taller than the window boards.Curtains hanging too lowHanging the curtains just above the window or halfway between the window and the ceiling used to be the norm, but according to the pros it is a missed opportunity.Do this instead: Hang the curtains as close to the ceiling as you can. This makes even small windows look big. Also extend the curtains on the width so that they extend 10-15 cm (4-6") past the outer edge of the window board. In this way, most of the window is visible when the curtains are not shut closed, creating the illusion of larger windows and maximizing natural light.Too small carpetToo small a mat can make a room feel divided and chopped and easily destroy the overall impression of the room.Do this instead: Allow the carpet to extend beyond the edges of the furniture or furnitures. In large rooms, it is best to have a larger mat where the furniture is directly on the mat, while a furniture in a smaller room can advantageously stand outside the mat as long as some of the legs are still on the mat.Paintings hanging at the wrong heightHaving to bend your neck to be able to look at a painting is both uncomfortable and impractical. You want your eyes to be able to wander around the room in a natural way, which is only possible if the paintings are at eye level.Here's how: Try splitting the walls into four horizontal rows. Hang your paintings or art in the second row from the top. To test if it works, you can use paint tape to measure the paintings on the wall before you hang them up.Furniture along the wallIf you have a small room, the first instinct might be to push every single piece of furniture as close to the wall as possible, but it can make the room feel even smaller! The “breathing room” near the walls makes a space feel bigger.Do this instead: Let a couple of furniture "float" in the room. Try to decorate a small room with two armchairs and a small mat a bit away from the wall. It gives the illusion of a more airy and less crowded room!White, white, whiteA common misconception is that painting a room completely in white also makes it feel larger and more beautiful, but it does not always work. If the room is very little natural light then white walls can easily look flat and dull.Do this instead: Try painting the room in a more neutral tone, e.g. a soft gray. These have soft, bluish undertones that give the illusion that the wall changes color during the day, giving the space a little more life than a regular white color would.Too bright lightsLighter is not always better when it comes to lamps. Lamps with far too high watts can make a room feel cold and sharp instead of warm and cozy.Do this instead: Stick to lamps with 60-75 watts in public areas where you still want work lights without being too intense and harsh. In more personal spaces such as bedrooms and bathrooms, 40-60 watts is your best option. It gives a softer and more atmospheric light while there is still sufficient lighting for e.g. reading. Another tip is to use more light sources instead of just having a ceiling light as the only light source in a room.Too few and too small paintingsIf you have a large wall with a lonely, small painting, it simply looks a little funny, as if the lone painting is floating on the wall rather than anchoring the space. It easily becomes distracting and does not utilize the room's full potential!Do this instead: There is a simple rule of thumb to hang art above a bed or sofa. The painting or artwork must fill at least two-thirds of the wall space directly above the furniture in order for it to feel balanced. However, you do not need to get a giant board to fill the space, but can "cheat" a little by hanging several paintings in an asymmetrical grid above the furniture and thus filling the same wall surface.Too many decorative pillowsIt's easy to feel that you need a whole lot of decorative pillows to make your sofa feel cozy, but far too many pillows can instead have the opposite effect.Do this instead: Stick to the simple. Two pillows on each end are really all you need to make a sofa feel both hip and cozy without feeling overcrowded and cluttered. If you want to increase the cozy factor, try using a large and a smaller pillow at each end of the sofa.Furnitures blocking the room's flowIt may be tempting to set the sofa so that it faces a window or fireplace, but if that means you are greeted by the back of the sofa as you enter the room then it is generally less pleasant. To be met by the back of the sofa, and the backs of those sitting in it, when you walk into a room can easily feel unwelcome.Do this instead: If you have a large wall, use it to anchor your sofa in the room. It is much nicer to be met by a couch or armchair's front when entering a room because they are not as clumsy. If, on the other hand, you can't hide the sofa's back against a wall, you can always soften the look by placing a small console table in front of your back and decorating it with books and other decorative items.

Interior design trends in 2020 - 6 major trends of the year

Interior design trends in 2020 - 6 major trends of the year

A new decade and new trends! What do the interior design trends for 2020 actually look like? What stands out at the big interior design trade fairs? Anna María Larsson helps you find your way through the maze of trends.Photo: Anna María LarssonTime for socializing We want 2020 to be a fun year. It will be the roaring 20's again, but with awareness. We want time to socialize and have fun together with those we care about. We decorate our homes more personally and we would rather have furniture with a story and history than something mass-produced which everyone else owns. Time has become a status symbol and having time for dinners, socializing and personal meetings is highly valued. And since everyone wants a home with a personal touch and their own style, then anything goes. This explains the many different colors that are predicted to be the trend colors of the year.ColorsThis year, there is no ONE obvious color that is the color of the year. Instead, we see several different colors named for this year's color. It is everything from different shades of yellow to a classic blue, more earthy brown burnt tones and pink. And that is probably it. Color is the very thing, everything is allowed! We want to create a cozy feel and a home to feel good in. White has gone from being the neutral standard to beige and gray tones becoming the neutral and "unpainted" instead. In the few places we have white, it is a choice rather than a standard. Although anything goes as far as color, some colors are still more trendy than others:Yellow

Bright, vivid colors in Erica Jacobson's first wallpaper collection

Bright, vivid colors in Erica Jacobson's first wallpaper collection

Bright, vivid colors and graphic elements have become Erica Jacobson's hallmark.She finds inspiration throughout the entire world from art, books, and people to fabric patterns and typography. She describes her new collection - In My Mind collection as playful, warm, and full of energy. We met up with Erica Jacobson to ask her some questions about the wallpaper collection and the creative process behind the creation.What does your creative work process look like?I usually go to art exhibitions and look at a lot in books and some things on the Internet when I start a job; I might need to read up on the subject I am going to work with. After that, I put it together in a mood board to focus on a feeling in both form and manner. Then I make a lot of drawings by hand, using only black pen and black gouache. The drawings are scanned and then I color them digitally.How come you start by drawing in black and white?I want it to feel handmade because every brush stroke and pen stroke should get a living expression.I make several black and white drawings to give myself a quantity to choose from. Most often it is the sketchier drawings that are good; they are a little unconscious. If you try to correct it and do it "properly," it is easy to lose the feeling in the expression. If I want to use color directly, silk screening is my favorite technique because I can fill large surfaces and shapes with color.Where do you get your inspiration?I am inspired primarily by art, travel, colors, and designs. Exciting people, vegetation, silk screening, and typography. Right now I am looking at Vogue covers from the 1930s and fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent's collections during the 1980s. Artists such as Matisse, Sonia Delaunay, Niki de Saint Phalle, and Marina Abramovic also inspire me.

Grey Gardens - a magnificent and mysterious collection of surrealist wallpaper patterns

Grey Gardens - a magnificent and mysterious collection of surrealist wallpaper patterns

Beata Boucht's detailed illustrations are characterized by her playful and surreal visual style. In GREY GARDENS, Beata Boucht worked specifically with unique oversized patterns to really enhance the feeling of being cloaked under a leafy weeping willow or being surrounded by a dense primeval forest.The collection draws inspiration from myriad sources but especially from the wild garden in the movie Grey Gardens, a film that depicts its eccentric protagonists at home in their decadent mansion in East Hampton, New York. The distinctive collection is home to many motifs such as an array of decorative leaves from various landscapes all over the world, selections of intricate and richly detailed flowers, as well as deep dives into the extensive and ornate veins of leaves and plants. The designs utilize a carefully balanced colour palette that emphasizes the boldness of its subjects while still yielding a surprisingly calm expression.“I wanted to create wallpaper patterns that would endure and that I wouldn’t tire of. Patterns you can lose yourself in and where you are constantly discovering something new. A place where you can find respite in the details and where your eyes get lost in the fantasy of the landscapes, finding a new kind of calm in the midst of the untamed wilds”, remarked Beata Boucht.A self-described maximalist, Beata’s artistic process consists of using various techniques and materials to create deep and complex patterns by working on a piece in several layers. She starts out with pencil drawings done by hand and then adds colour with watercolours or gouache, finalizing the piece with collage techniques and digital processing."I think we will become more courageous, more daring in our ability to express ourselves, and become more personal when we decorate our homes in the future," said Beata Boucht.The GREY GARDENS collection gives your room a feeling of magnificence with its grandiose settings. The captivating motifs create a brilliant spatial dynamic full of rich details that are impossible to resist.The GREY GARDENS collection consists of seven wallpaper patterns and nine posters that are all available exclusively at Photowall.

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